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Toolkit

“ENJOYING MY HOME”: Supported Housing Considerations and Options in Autism and Intellectual Disability

AIDE Canada
Housing is important as it is where we live much of our daily life. It should be a place of enjoyment, community and safety. This Toolkit offers an overview of supported housing options for autistic individuals and/or individuals with intellectual disability, along with examples of resources in selected Canadian cities. Five 'styles' or approaches of supported housing are described, along with a rating of estimated levels of support provided, cost and availability of each approach (although this will vary based on community and time). The styles of housing described comprise: (1) Community Living with Wrap-Around Supports, (2) Semi-Independent Living with 'Light' Supports, (3) Supportive Roommates, (4) Home Sharing, and (5) Community Care (Group Home/Home Collectivity). Ideas for moving forward are also offered.

Housing is important – our home is where we live much of our daily life. It should be a place of community, safety and enjoyment. Determining the ideal type of housing and ensuring a deep sense of community can be challenging, especially as autistic youth and individuals with intellectual disability move into and through adulthood. It is critically important that housing options are available, offer the support that is needed by an individual and are affordable and sustainable.

For far too many individuals, this basic hope and right seems beyond easy reach. Currently, there are extensive waitlists for subsidized housing in many communities, along with supported housing shortages; hence, this issue of supported housing has become an urgent issue and need in Canada.

In this Toolkit, some common styles of supported housing for autistic individuals and/or individuals with intellectual disabilities are described, along with resources in selected Canadian communities. Ideas for moving forward are offered.

 

A. Considering Your Housing Needs 

Safe, stable and comfortable housing is exceptionally important in our lives. How conducive is your home to your needs now and into the future?  Does your housing situation fit with what you need and value; that is, where you want to live and with the supports that allow you to pursue the choices that are important to you and bring you joy and comfort?

If it is true that home is one’s ‘sanctuary’, planning is needed for housing to allow for choice, self-determination, and quality of life. One’s home should be an environment which brings contentment and be conducive to sensory needs. A key part of a strong housing plan is safety both in one’s home and also in one’s neighborhood. Access to services and amenities that allow one to remain as independent as possible, safe, and connected in the community, are critical criteria for a suitable housing solution. One’s home needs to offer support that matches their support needs and preferences. This entails:

    1. Relational engagement – within the home, and in the community
    2. Thriving and enjoyment in daily routines and activities (e.g., work, transportation, recreation, friendship, etc.).

Crucial to suitable and sustainable housing is affordability. The long-term financial viability of various supported housing alternatives must be considered in weighing options.

Working through various considerations – preferences, support needs, community access, cost – the role of a housing “broker/advocate” and “supporter” is crucial in achieving housing solutions both now and in the future.

 

B. The Importance of a Broker/Advocate and Supporter

Many adults in the autistic or intellectual disability community will need a housing broker/advocate person to assist them with their housing needs. This individual or group of individuals can seek to ensure that needs and priorities of the individual are met within their housing plan and ultimately, their home.

Supportive roles that could be fulfilled include determining, with the individual, their hopes and dreams in housing, the types/extent of support needed, relevant and preferred housing styles, and a business plan to cover costs, i.e., affordability. The housing broker/advocate has an important role in supporting the individual as they determine what is available in their jurisdiction and if not available, what could be advocated for and to whom. 

In some cases, individuals or families may have moved, or would consider moving, to another city or town to access preferred housing supports. In such instances, careful investigation is recommended before making a cross-region move. Some questions to ask may be:

  • What are the resources available in the incoming community compared to those in your current community?
  • How difficult would it be to access those services? Talking to other families in similar circumstances may be helpful as what is publicly conveyed may be different than what truly happens ‘on the ground’.
  • What are the natural or informal supports that might be lost or gained when leaving one’s current community and moving to the new community?
  • What would it be like for the young adult to relocate to another jurisdiction? If that was to happen, what would make that transition easier for them?

In weighing supported housing styles and their fit for you/your family member, multiple issues must be considered: availability, level of support needed, access to amenities, capital and monthly housing costs, and cost for support services. Thinking carefully about what is important to you/your family member, seems crucial in weighing long-term housing solutions. Here are a few key considerations.

i. Cost: The cost of housing ranges significantly by city/region and type of housing arrangement. Capital and monthly housing costs, along with expenses for needed support, invites inquiry. What is available in your situation from public and/or private funding resources? Low-Income housing costs generally mean no more than 30% of one’s income, and affordable housing generally is viewed to be 10 to 20% below market rent which, in expensive housing markets, can still be very costly. Another consideration, related to housing type and cost, entails the option of an owned or rented unit.

a. Owned Unit: House or condo ownership may be an option for a housing arrangement with supportive others, including roommate(s), or for semi-independent living with occasional support. This option may be more appropriate for individuals with lower support needs and sufficient personal or family financial resources to cover the purchase and maintenance costs of a property. Like condos, co-op housing can provide involvement through an association as well as group support.

A not-for-profit society or ‘network of support’ may be a helpful resource for administering an owned property. Such an approach may be helpful for individuals or small groups of individuals living in a home/condo. This option also has been used by families or communities in providing housing for individuals with high support needs, and serves in managing the cost of home purchase and upkeep as well as ongoing support.

A caution in considering home ownership by an individual with autism or intellectual disability is to ensure that one’s growing equity in their owned home, i.e., a capital asset, or home ownership itself, does not impede current or future eligibility for benefits that could ensure financial viability such as monthly support and/or health/medication coverage. Remember that housing is only part of the overall package of planning for a ‘good life’. Individuals and families are advised to carefully examine regulations governing home ownership and as relevant, consider issues of guardianship and trusteeship relative to ownership. Legal advice with an individual who has expertise in housing and disability in your jurisdiction is strongly advised.

b. Rented/Leased Unit: Renting/leasing are viable housing options. Unlike purchasing property, minimal financial outlay generally is needed to rent a unit (beyond security/damage deposit and rent). However, there is less security in this housing arrangement, as rented property generally can be sold or tenancies can be ended by a landlord. A life lease agreement provides the exclusive right to occupy housing for one’s lifetime or a defined period of time. This tool thus might be particularly useful for those with lower resource needs and either low or high support needs.

Most municipalities provide some form of low-income housing options which perhaps can be combined with agency support, as needed. Such an arrangement may be useful for individuals with minimal support needs, but also could offer options for those with greater support needs who could integrate additional home-based community supports.

 

ii. Availability: There is diversity in the ‘style’ or type of housing, and what is available in a given region and at a given time, although generally there is insufficient supported housing supply in Canada. This may be even more challenging for those with moderate support needs and in communities with high housing costs. Of further challenge, affordable supportive housing may be less available when individuals do not meet eligibility criteria for adult-based government support. Determining what you are eligible for in your province/territory and municipality is important. Individuals and families are strongly encouraged to put their name on wait lists for desired housing resources as early as possible.

 

iii. Level of Support Needed: There is a wide range of levels of support in daily living that may be needed. Supports can include daily or just periodic monitoring, assistance when needs arise, potential referral to other supports, assistance with financial planning, support with medical and nutritional needs, social and recreational activities, vocational involvement, and/or personal care, ranging from minimal to continual (24/7) support. Carefully considering the nature and extent of support that is needed is crucial, and likely will guide the selection of housing options.

Keep in mind that the level of support needed by an individual now or in the near future, may change across the lifespan or relative to episodic issues or challenges along the way. Flexibility in considering an individual’s needs allows for fluidity if shifts emerge.

Note: Individuals with substantial support needs (e.g., complex medical or mental health needs) may require residential care in the form of assisted living or skilled nursing settings. Such settings are beyond the scope of this toolkit. If this level of support is needed, please consult your family doctor or a community professional (e.g., social worker) to help you access services.

 

iv: Access to Amenities:  A supportive community is important to all, including those with autism and/or intellectual disabilities. It is important to intentionally make housing plans, relative to what the individual values and needs. Based on what is enjoyed and valued, specific housing options and neighborhoods can be sought – particularly those with conducive resources and amenities. Examples could include: community groups, libraries, shopping venues, public transportation access, employment/vocation, recreational and community facilities, faith community, location of informal meaningful relationships/family, and whatever or whoever else is valued by the individual. Ensuring that a community allows for safety in their coming and going is particularly important. For some with moderate to higher care needs, basic questions include: does the housing solution offer basic needs such as meals, housekeeping, and laundry services? The answer to these types of questions may have a bearing on both the level of support and the style of housing determined to be viable.

 

Styles of Housing

Considering items addressed above, we now turn to five of the many styles of supported housing in Canada and elsewhere. The supported housing styles we are addressing below are:

1. Community Living with Wrap-Around Supports

2. Semi-independent Living – Light Supports

3. Supportive Roommates

5. Home Sharing

6. Community Care (Group Home/Home Collectivity)

 

These supported housing options generally range from less to more intensive supports offered. Each style is briefly described, along with an estimated cost comparison and the availability of each option. While we estimate cost, support and availability, it is important to note that there are many factors and substantial variation within these and other styles of housing.

Embedded in selected housing styles, video segments offer examples of individuals who have utilized that housing resource. We further offer selected examples of housing resources from within selected cities. In these and other communities, we suggest contacting housing and autism or intellectual disability advocacy organizations to determine more details about these and other options.

Appendix A offers some housing resources in selected Canadian cities.

Appendix B is an infographic which briefly summarizes housing cost, support offered, and availability for each of the following supported housing style.

 

 

  1. Community Living with Wrap-Around Supports 


    • Cost: 4/5 (fairly high)
    • Extent of support: 2/5
    • Availability: 1/5 (available only in some jurisdictions, with limited access)

Similar to what has more commonly been viewed as seniors-style housing, this model offers individual or shared units in a purpose-built property, with communal or ‘wrap around’ support on-site. This style of housing suits those who are relatively independent, but would benefit from nearby support. It could be integrated with a seniors or similar supported living development. Variations on this approach include the potential for multiple units in close proximity, with on- or off-site light support, or several individuals sharing a house with light on- or off-site support. Co-op housing, individual ownership, and shared housing approaches could adopt this model of community living. Where funding is available from government or other sources, agencies potentially could be engaged to provide wrap-around services.

 

A Brief Introduction to First Place in Phoenix, Arizona

 

 

For more detailed information about First Place and this approach to supported housing, view this extended interview with Denise Resnick, Founder and President/CEO, First Place – AZ

 

  1. Semi-independent Living/Light Supports 

 

    • Cost 1/5 (lower support costs)
    • Extent of support: 3/5 (can range according to need)
    • Availability 2/5 (some communities)

A semi-independent living/light support model entails engagement in a market rent or low-income unit, with a light support package that provides low-cost supports, for instance, weekly check-ins and a monthly social activity from a community agency. This arrangement is built into a community model, and can be implemented within other models such as a roommate model whereby a support individual could receive subsidized or free rent for light support. 

Hear more about this style of housing from John Seigner

 

  1. Shared Roommates or Helper


    • Cost: 3/5 (can be challenging to access on an extended basis)
    • Extent of support: 3/5 (can range according to need)
    • Availability: 3/5 (moderate access)

A shared roommate or helper in a housing unit would likely fit for individuals able to live relatively independently i.e., who want to their own apartment, but require some light support. Communal space for social interaction, meals, recreation and programming can be offered. In properties with multiple units, a rent-subsidized suite could be offered to an individual or family providing support to the residents. In planning this type of housing, such a suite/rent subsidy scheme could be included in the initial capital cost.

Meet Taryn and her family as they reflect on their housing solution

  1. Home Sharing
    • Cost: 3/5 (moderate support costs, according to support requirements)
    • Extent of support: 3/5 (can range according to need)
    • Availability: 3/5 (moderate access)

In this approach, a family opens their home and provides support as agreed upon and is commensurate with the support needs of the individual (which can be negligible to substantial). This support is offered in an inclusive family-oriented environment. Funding support may be accessed by government or private funds, and can be agency-managed or supported by the individual and/or their family of origin. Variations of this model include living in an independent suite on the premises of a family property (e.g., secondary suite), but with support from the family in the other part of the property. As another approach, individuals and/or families could purchase a home, and rent it to a supportive family who live in the home and/or another part of the home.

  1. Community Care (Group Home/Home Collectivity)
    • Cost: 5/5 (extensive support costs, provincial/territorial payer resources potentially can be sought)
    • Extent of support: 5/5 (Continual 24/7 support)
    • Availability: 2/5 (varied, but limited access)

For those with substantial support needs, a housing collectivity (3-4 people) provides continual support in a community-based setting with funding support from provincial/territorial payers. This could include government-transfer funding, through direct agency or family managed services, depending on provincial/territorial guidelines. A common approach involves families of approximately three individuals requiring support who would pool resources to secure a home and make arrangements for support providers in the home (e.g., shifts that cover a 24/7 rotation). This arrangement may be most conducive when individual residents have similar support needs and common affinity with this housing approach. Families involved need to come to a common understanding about the house arrangement and support plan. A business plan is developed related to the acquisition of the housing unit and plan for support personnel. Pooling support dollars from the provincial/territorial payer allows for or subsidizes staff support costs.

Variations in this style of housing include the potential for congregate housing sites in one or more buildings to allow for sharing of staff as well as communal/community activity. Of note, more than 3 or 4 residents in a single unit likely requires a different housing/care designation, depending on jurisdictional requirements; hence careful investigation about organizing this type of housing is recommended.

Steps for Moving Forward

Where to Start

Implementing a housing plan requires attention to multiple factors that contribute to a life of quality for the individual with autism and/or intellectual disability. Considering what is valued and your/their preferences, optimal location, support requirements, sensory needs, safety planning, etc. are integral to a comprehensive plan. Training for support personnel is important, as is considering ways and places to meaningfully engage in community that promote quality of life and support the individual to thrive. 

The following questions invite consideration for determining and planning for particular housing solutions.

Questions to Ponder:

  1. What are your/your family member’s hope for housing now and in the future?
  2. Of the options presented in this Toolkit, what style of housing could support that hope?
  3. What resources are needed to move toward your preferred housing option?
  4. What type and extent of support would be needed?
  5. How could this level of support be paid for on an ongoing basis?

Activity: Develop a Housing ‘Business Plan”

  • Write out Your Housing Plan

A.  Aims and Approach

  • Vision and goals such as location and housing arrangement
  • Support needs
  • Preferred housing style and why

B. Talk with other families and support agencies regarding how they have navigated this housing solution

C. Write out a Business Plan

  • Funding sources for your housing style
    • Capital costs
    • Monthly costs
  • Funding sources
    • What resources are available?
    • What additional resources are needed?
  • How could needed resources be secured over time?

D. Plan for Sustainability

A Few Final Thoughts… with John Seigner

 

 

 

Appendix A: Some Housing Resources in Selected Canadian Cities

Below is a list with examples of housing resources in the following cities, illustrating various urban municipalities across Canada. Note that we only provide three examples of selected types of resources for each city and the rates listed (if provided) are based on what was reported to us at the time of data collection. Inclusion on this list does not indicate an endorsement by AIDE Canada. Rates and estimates for each region are constantly changing, so it is important to independently verify all services offered and costs associated with each organization. We are not responsible for the accuracy of this information.

  • Calgary
  • Halifax
  • Montreal
  • St. John’s
  • Toronto
  • Vancouver
  • Winnipeg

CALGARY

Calgary – Cost of having support staff for 4hrs a day (relevant to both the “Community Living with wrap-around supports” and “Community Care [Group Home/Home Collectivity]” housing options)

Comfort Keepers Calgary

Comfort Keepers Calgary providers in-home health care services in Calgary.

+1 403 228 0072

Rates: $35 p/h*4 =$140

Samaritan Caregivers

Samaritan Caregivers Inc is a company that provides non-medical home care services in Calgary and surrounding areas. The services are for individuals of all ages.

https://www.samaritancaregiver.com/

+1 403 991 5202

Rates: $34-37 p/h*4 = $136-148

The Compassion Network

The Compassion Network provides in-home health care services to help people thrive and function in their own homes regardless of age or health challenges.

https://www.compassionnetwork.ca/

+1 877 432 1676

Rates: $34.50 p/h*4 = $138

Residential Settings in Calgary (relevant to “Community Living with wrap-around supports”, “Semi-independent living/light supports”, or “Supportive Roommates” housing options)

Aspires Housing Group of Calgary

The Aspires Housing Group provides families with mutual support and opportunities to network while working to develop family-driven housing solutions.

https://sinneavefoundation.org/sinneave_work_item/aspires-housing-committee-calgary/

 +1 403 210 5000

Above and Beyond Care

This group provides residential housing, respite, community and recreational activities, and professional aid that caters to an individual’s needs.

https://www.aboveandbeyondcare.ca/index.php

+1 403 616 2731

Rates: Individuals with lower support needs between $90,000-$150,000, Individuals with high support needs up to $500,000 per year

Resicare Society of Calgary

Community Based Residential Services are offered based on consideration of client need and interest and available resources.

http://www.resicare.org/

403-286-3709

Rates: $10,800 per year

Affordable Housing Calgary (relevant to “Semi-independent living/light supports”, or “Supportive Roommates” housing options)

Horizon Housing

Horizon Housing provides homes to families and individuals from a variety of backgrounds and experiences, including people living with mental health challenges, brain injuries and physical disabilities as well as individuals and families living below the poverty line.

https://www.horizonhousing.ab.ca/about/our-tenants/

+1 403 297 1746

Rates: Average rent for a one-bedroom apartment is $486 per month

Home Space: Legacy on 5th

Home Space is a charitable real estate developer, rental housing owner, and property manager. They provide housing in over 30 properties throughout Calgary and work with social service agencies who provide supports to residents.

https://homespace.org/properties/downtown-legacy-on-5th/

+1 587 320 1545

Rates: Average rent for a one-bedroom per month is $800

Forward Housing: Bishop’s Manor

Bishop’s Manor supports tenants from a wide range of backgrounds and experiences.

https://forwardhousing.ca/about-forward-housing/

+1 403 282 6565

Rates: Average rent for a one-bedroom per month is $600

House Purchase Calgary: Based on a 3 bed/3 people sharing (relevant for “Community Care [Group Home/Home Collectivity]” housing option)

Average cost of a home:  $547,720

30-year mortgage split 3 ways: $2923.13/3 = $974.38 each per month       

Average cost of hourly support staff: $35

Average cost of cleaners:  $30 p/h


HALIFAX

Halifax – Cost of having support staff for 4hrs a day (relevant to both the “Community Living with wrap-around supports” and “Community Care [Group Home/Home Collectivity]” housing options)

Always Home Homecare

Always Home Homecare offers hourly home care services to help with personal care assistance and lifestyle support in Halifax and surrounding areas.

https://alwayshomecare.ca/our-services/

+1 855 904 4400

Rates: $31p/h *4 = $124

Home Instead

Home Instead offers a variety of in-home care options to support independence not only for seniors, but for anyone needing assistance and respite care.

https://www.homeinstead.ca/location/3008/home-instead-about-us/history-mission/

+1 902 800 7552

Rates: $37.50p/h *4 = $150

Comfort Keepers

Comfort Keepers provides in-home care to clients who need help with the activities of daily living.

https://www.comfortkeepers.ca/halifax/

+1 902 446 4545

Rates: $35-42.50 *4 = $140-165

Residential Settings in Halifax (relevant to “Community Living with wrap-around supports”, “Semi-independent living/light supports”, or “Supportive Roommates” housing options)

Community Living Centres

Community Living Centres help individuals move from institutional settings back into their chosen communities.

https://communitylivingcentres.com/about-us

+1 902 492 0681

Metro Community Housing

Metro Community Housing Association operates group homes in the Halifax / Dartmouth area which provide twenty-four-hour staff support for the eight to ten people who reside in each of the homes.

https://www.mcha.ns.ca/services-homes.html

+1 902 453 6444

Colonial Homes

Colonial Community Services Limited has homes located throughout the Halifax Regional Municipality. They provide several options when individuals cannot live independently without supervision and support. They provide residential care settings and small option homes.

https://www.colonialhomes.ca/about-us/

+1 902 420 0697

Affordable Housing Halifax (relevant to “Semi-independent living/light supports”, or “Supportive Roommates” housing options)

Harbour City Homes

Provides affordable housing in the downtown Halifax area.

https://www.harbourcityhomes.org/

+1 902 490 6277

Affordable Housing Association Nova Scotia

Affordable Housing Association Nova Scotia is a non-profit housing developer and provider.

https://www.ahans.ca/

+1 902 406 4276

Housing Nova Scotia

Housing Nova Scotia is the provincial government agency responsible for the administration and delivery of affordable housing solutions for low-to modest income Nova Scotians. They work closely with other levels of government as well as private and community partners to develop a wide range of affordable housing options along the housing continuum.

https://housing.novascotia.ca/

+1 844 424 5110

House Purchase Halifax: Based on a 3 bed/3 people sharing (relevant for “Community Care [Group Home/Home Collectivity]” housing option)

Average cost of a home: $459,200

30-year mortgage split 3 ways: $2,450.71/3 = $816.90 each per month       

Average cost of hourly support staff: $35p/h

Average cost of cleaners: $30p/h


MONTREAL

Montreal – Cost of having support staff for 4hrs a day (relevant to both the “Community Living with wrap-around supports” and “Community Care [Group Home/Home Collectivity]” housing options)

Home Care Assistance

Home Care Assistance offers flexible care schedules where clients have the opportunity to choose daytime, night or weekend care schedules.

https://www.homecareassistancemontreal.ca/our-caregivers.html

+1 514 612 2837

ParaMed

ParaMed offers a range of customized services designed to meet individual client needs, allowing clients to remain in their own home or environment of choice with as much independence as possible.

https://www.paramed.com/services/help-at-home/

+1 905 470 4000

Care.com provides a range of support and resources to assist clients based on their needs.

https://www.care.com/en-ca/profiles/special-needs/autism-care/montreal

membercareca@care.com

Residential Settings in Montreal (relevant to “Community Living with wrap-around supports”, “Semi-independent living/light supports”, or “Supportive Roommates” housing options)

Compagnons de Montréal

Compagnons de Montréal is a non-profit organization that provides stimulating living, learning and inclusion environments for adults living with an intellectual disability or autism spectrum disorder.

info@compagnonsdemontreal.com

+1 514 727 4444

Treiser Maison Shalom

Treiser Maison Shalom is a professionally run group home where people with intellectual, emotional and physical disabilities are cared for in a family-style atmosphere. The homes (2 duplexes) have permanent residents and also care for a large number of young adults, providing short- and long-term relief for families of individuals with special needs.

https://treisermaisonshalom.com/

+1 514 738 8708

Miriam Home and Services

The Miriam Home and Services Residential Program offers a continuum of unique community living arrangements in accordance with the needs and abilities of clients. Some housing is adapted to meet the needs of individuals who may also have multiple physical disabilities. They can offer support in the form of community-based homes, intermediate and family-type resources, and supervised apartments.

http://www.centremiriam.ca/en

+1 514 345 0210

Affordable Housing Montreal (relevant to “Semi-independent living/light supports”, or “Supportive Roommates” housing options)

Kehilla Montreal

Kehilla Montréal Residential Programs offers affordable housing by leveraging government funded programs and private partnerships.

https://kehillamontreal.org/

+1 438 789 3197

Office Municipal d’habitation de Montréal (OMHM)

The OMHM manages and administers housing and housing programs to low-income families and individuals and offers social and community activities.

https://www.omhm.qc.ca/fr/a-propos-de-nous

+1 514 872 6442

Rate: The rent for these dwellings is established at 25% of the household income. They are offered to households that meet the eligibility criteria.

Société d’habitation et de développement de Montréal (SHDM)

SHDM PROVIDES BELOW MARKET RENTAL UNITS AND PERSONALIZED SERVICES OFFERED BY PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS.

+1 514 380 7436

House Purchase Montreal: Based on a 3 bed/3 people sharing (relevant for “Community Care [Group Home/Home Collectivity]” housing option)

Average cost of a home:  $550,000

30-year mortgage split 3 ways: $2935.30/3 = $978.43 each per month       

Average cost of hourly support staff: $25

Average cost of cleaners:  $22 p/h

JOHN’S

St. John’s – Cost of having support staff for 4hrs a day (relevant to both the “Community Living with wrap-around supports” and “Community Care [Group Home/Home Collectivity]” housing options)

Bayshore HealthCare

Bayshore HealthCare provides help with grocery shopping and errands, post-surgical care, in-hospital observational care, and provides 24/7 services to youths and adults with developmental delays.

https://www.bayshore.ca/locations/bayshore-home-health-st-John’s-nl/

+1 877 289 3997

Helping Hands Home Care Services Ltd.

Helping Hands provides home health services, including home support and nursing services.

https://www.facebook.com/HelpingHandsHomeCareCA/

+1 709 754 3395

Compassion Home Care

Compassion Home Care provides services from as little as a few hours to 24 hours a day.

http://compassionhomecare.ca/

+1 800 563 1588

Residential Settings in St. John’s (relevant to “Community Living with wrap-around supports”, “Semi-independent living/light supports”, or “Supportive Roommates” housing options)

AXIS Family Resources

Axis Family Resources provide staffed homes and offer up to 24/7 support based on individual needs. Front-line staff are supported by leadership teams in each community, and agency-wide support.

https://axis.bc.ca/services/specialized-supportive-housing/

+1 877 392 1003

The Arc of St. John’s

Arc of St. John’s operates residential homes and highly specialized care, including support for individuals requiring nursing care.

https://www.arcsj.org/services/residential-care-living/

+1 904 824 7249

Stella’s Circle

Stella’s Circle addresses the need for affordable housing for people who face barriers by offering housing units to rent and supportive housing.

https://stellascircle.ca/need-help/real-homes/

+1 709 738 8390

Affordable Housing St. John’s (relevant to “Semi-independent living/light supports”, or “Supportive Roommates” housing options)

John’s Non-Profit Housing

The City of St. John’s Non-Profit Housing Division is responsible for the management of 476 residential rental units throughout the city. These houses and apartments vary in size from one to four-bedroom units and are available for rent to low-income earners based on their family net income. Net income is defined as gross income minus mandatory income tax deduction, EI and CPP deductions.

http://www.stJohn’s.ca/living-st-John’s/city-services/non-profit-housing

+1 709 576 8196

Rates: Studios starting at $750 per month, 1 bed starting at $800 per month

Grenfell Court

Grenfell Court offers affordable housing with amenities.

https://www.rentnorthview.com/apartments/grenfell-court

+1 709 757 2787

Rates: 1 bed,1 bath starting at $800 a month

Wyndwood Heights

Wyndwood Heights offers affordable housing with amenities.

https://www.rentnorthview.com/apartments/wyndwood-heights

+1 709 757 2787

Rates: 1 bed,1 bath starting at $885 a month

House Purchase St. John’s: Based on a 3 bed/3 people sharing (relevant for “Community Care [Group Home/Home Collectivity]” housing option)

Average cost of a home: $371,970

30-year mortgage split 3 ways: $1985.17/3 = $661.72 each per month       

Average cost of hourly support staff: $35p/h

Average cost of cleaners: $30p/h


TORONTO

Toronto – Cost of having support staff for 4hrs a day (relevant to both the “Community Living with wrap-around supports” and “Community Care [Group Home/Home Collectivity]” housing options)

Comfort Keepers Toronto

Comfort Keepers Toronto provides in-home health care services in Toronto.

https://www.comfortkeepers.ca/toronto/

 +1 416 800 2535

 Rates: $35 p/h *4 = $140

Above and Beyond Home Care

Above and Beyond provides in-home care.

https://aboveandbeyondhomecare.ca/

+ 1 866 466 9091

Rates: $25-35 p/h *4 = $100-140

Angels Home & Community Care

Angels Home & Community Care provides specialized care at home or in a care setting to address a variety of needs and support requirements.

http://www.angelshome.ca/

+1 647 380 3242

Rates: $16-21*4 = $64-84

Residential Settings in Toronto (relevant to “Community Living with wrap-around supports”, “Semi-independent living/light supports”, or “Supportive Roommates” housing options)

Burnview Crescent Group Home

Burnview Crescent is a group home with 24-hour on-site personal care and support services to assist adults with multiple physical and developmental disabilities aged 18 years and over who are able to direct their own care.

information@phtpa.ca (No website)
+1 416 439 3226

Rates: Primarily funded by ODSP > Rent portion is $1021 p/m Province covers the ‘care’ portion

SurexCare

SurexCare provides community support services and residential long-term care to adults with a developmental disability and dual diagnosis (developmental and behavioral problems). They also offer adult day programming that includes recreational activities, educational training, social and life skills development, emotional support, and community events.

http://www.surexcare.com/

+1 416 469 4109

L’Arche Toronto

L’Arche Toronto provides long term residential care in community settings as well as programming and workshops for independent living.

http://www.larchetoronto.org/

+1 416 406 2869

Rates: Primarily funded by ODSP > Rent portion is $1021 p/m Province covers the ‘care’ portion

Affordable Housing Toronto (relevant to “Semi-independent living/light supports”, or “Supportive Roommates” housing options)

St. Clare’s is a charitable organization that provides mixed-income housing in downtown Toronto. Most tenants pay a rent-geared-to-their-income; others pay market rent for their apartments.

http://www.stclares.ca/

+1 416 961 2444

Wigwamen

Wigwamen Incorporated is Ontario’s oldest and largest urban Indigenous housing provider offering affordable housing to thousands of Indigenous and non-Indigenous families, singles, and seniors.

http://www.wigwamen.com/

+1 416 481 4451

Portland Place Non-Profit Housing Corp

Portland Place is a non-profit housing corporation that provides rent geared to income housing with programs and supports for individuals with a wide range of needs.

https://pccweb.ca/portlandplace/

+1 416 703 0652

House Purchase Toronto: Based on a 3 bed/3 people sharing (relevant for “Community Care [Group Home/Home Collectivity]” housing option)

Average cost of a home:  $1.3 million

25-year mortgage split 3 ways: $6397.98/3 = $2132.66 each per month       

Average cost of hourly support staff: $30 p/h

Average cost of cleaners:  $40 p/h


VANCOUVER

Vancouver – Cost of having support staff for 4hrs a day (relevant to both the “Community Living with wrap-around supports” and “Community Care [Group Home/Home Collectivity]” housing options)

Comfort Keepers

Comfort Keepers provides in-home care to clients who need help with the activities of daily living.

https://www.comfortkeepers.ca/vancouver/

+1 604 200 7893

Rates: $40p/h *4 = $160

Nurse Next Door

Provides in-home companion care for a wide range of needs.

https://www.nursenextdoor.com/

+1 604 961 5533

Rates: $38-45 *4 = $152-180

Homecare Assistant

Home Care Assistance provides flexible in-home care for a range of needs and services.

https://www.homecareassistancevancouver.ca/

+1 778 279 3634

Rates: $40-$37.5 * 4 = $160-150

Residential Settings in Vancouver (relevant to “Community Living with wrap-around supports”, “Semi-independent living/light supports”, or “Supportive Roommates” housing options)

North Shore Connexions Society

ConneXions supports individuals with living with intellectual disabilities across North Vancouver. Three to five people live together as roommates in each home while staff provide support. Residents are encouraged to be included in the community and many have jobs, volunteer, attend day programs, and/or participate in local groups.

https://nsconnexions.org/

+1 604 984 9321

Developmental Disabilities Association

Developmental Disabilities Association has residences across Vancouver to accommodate a diverse population of adults through site-specific environmental design and personalized supports targeting identified areas of need. Staffing is provided on a 24-hour, 7 day a week model, with the level of intensity varying with needs.

https://www.develop.bc.ca/programs/adult-services/#residential

+1 604 233 5486 Taja

Greater Vancouver Community Services Society (GVCSS)

GVCSS operates homes in the Lower Mainland for adult individuals with developmental disabilities. Located in residential neighborhoods in Vancouver, Richmond, and North Vancouver, each home is designed to facilitate the individuals’ independence and community involvement. 

https://www.gvcss.bc.ca/communitylivingprogram.htm

+1 604 714 3507

Rates: $100,000 yearly

Affordable Housing Vancouver (relevant to “Semi-independent living/light supports”, or “Supportive Roommates” housing options)

THIS MIXED-USE AFFORDABLE HOUSING BUILDING IS A PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN CATALYST AND THE VANCOUVER AFFORDABLE HOUSING AGENCY (VAHA). A PORTION OF THE UNITS ARE SET ASIDE FOR ADULTS WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES. RESIDENTS WHO ARE NOT ABLE TO LIVE WITHOUT ADDITIONAL SUPPORT EITHER PAY FOR ADDITIONAL SUPPORT STAFF OR LIVE WITH ROOMMATES TO HELP FOSTER INDEPENDENT LIVING SKILLS.

https://catalystcommdev.org/renters/aspen

Rate: Studio $1000 p/m

PALS Adult Services Society (PASS)

PASS provides day programs and long-term affordable rental units for individuals with developmental disabilities and their caregivers. They provide programming and coordination to encourage interdependence, provide community oversight, facilitate respite, and minimize isolation.

https://www.passadultservices.ca/housing

+1 604 872 7257 lauren.c@passadultservices.ca

BC Housing -Supportive Housing

BC Housing- Supportive Housing is a non-profit housing provider that operates supportive housing units. Supportive housing provides a range of on-site, non-clinical supports such as: life skills training, connections to health care, mental health or substance-use services. Staff are on-site 24/7 to provide support.

https://www.bchousing.org/housing-assistance/housing-with-support/supportive-housing

+1 604 433 2218  

Rates: $480-780 for a studio

House Purchase Vancouver: Based on a 3 bed/3 people sharing (relevant for “Community Care [Group Home/Home Collectivity]” housing option)

Average cost of a home:  $1.3 million

30-year mortgage split 3 ways: $6397.98/3 = $2132.66 each per month       

Average cost of hourly support staff: $40 p/h

Average cost of cleaners:  $30 p/h


WINNIPEG

Winnipeg – Cost of having support staff for 4hrs a day (relevant to both the “Community Living with wrap-around supports” and “Community Care [Group Home/Home Collectivity]” housing options)

Home Care Assistant

Home Care Assistance offers flexible in-home care and services depending on individual needs.

https://www.homecareassistancewinnipeg.ca/

+1 204 819 4068

Just Like Family Home Care

Just Like Family Home Care provides overnight & live-in care, home support, and companionship to support individuals with a range of needs.

https://winnipeg.justlikefamily.ca/

+1 204 894 2519

Home Instead

Home Instead provides personalized in-home care to assist with independent living skills and support needs.

https://www.homeinstead.ca/location/3021

+1 204 800 8102

Residential Settings in Winnipeg (relevant to “Community Living with wrap-around supports”, “Semi-independent living/light supports”, or “Supportive Roommates” housing options)

Arcane Horizon Community

Arcane Horizon Community connects individuals with residences, day programs, home sharing, and/or supported independent living services across Winnipeg. Individuals in residential living have 24-hour access to supports.

http://www.arcanehorizon.org/about

+1 204 897 5482

DASCH Inc.

DASCH Inc. supports people living in over 50 homes throughout Winnipeg. People can participate in personalized social, educational, vocational and recreational services that provide learning opportunities and greater independence.

https://www.dasch.mb.ca/about-dasch/

+1 204 987 1550

New Directions

New Directions offers Shift Staffed Homes (SSH) to provide 24-hour residential support for adults labeled with an intellectual disability. New Directions offers additional resources for a variety of social, emotional, and physical needs.

https://newdirections.mb.ca/

+1 204 786 7051

Affordable Housing Winnipeg(relevant to “Semi-independent living/light supports”, or “Supportive Roommates” housing options)

S.A.M Management Inc.

S.A.M. (Management) Inc. is a non-profit property management corporation that provides property management in partnership with organizations offering affordable housing options in the community.

https://www.sam.mb.ca/

+1 204 942 0991

Centennial Community Improvement Association

Construction on a three-storey, 47-micro-suite apartment building is planned. Some of the affordable housing units have been set aside for individuals with disabilities.

http://www.centennialneighbourhood.com/home-first-winnipeg.html

+1 204 806 5939

MUSE Flats (Affordable Housing Program 1)

The MUSE Flats are affordable units in Winnipeg. No additional services are offered. All utilities included. The current waitlist is estimated to be 2-3 years.

https://www.museflatswinnipeg.ca/floorplans/affordable-housing-program-1-units

+1 204 262 1038

Rates: Studio starting at $830 / 1 Bed starting at $1008

House Purchase Winnipeg: Based on a 3 bed/3 people sharing (relevant for “Community Care [Group Home/Home Collectivity]” housing option)

Average cost of a home: $401,000

30-year mortgage split 3 ways: $2140.10/3 = $803.37 each per month       

Average cost of hourly support staff: $ estimate not available

Average cost of cleaners: $25p/h

Appendix B: Supported Housing Infographic

Photo by Sigmund on Unsplash

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